Cognitive Milestones for three-year-olds

Have a preschooler at home? Check out the important cognitive milestones for three-year-olds.

By Arun Sharma

Cognitive Milestones for three-year-olds

By the time, children are three years old, they are involved in doing a lot of things. Some of the exciting things they may do during the preschooler stage are riding a tricycle, singing or humming to themselves. As they are super-curious, they also like to take a look at everything around the house. So, it is time for you to remove objects that may cause accidents and stock up on bandages and antibiotic ointment to treat those minor cuts and bruises. Let’s look at what a three-year-old’s cognitive abilities would be.

  1. Stacking and sorting: He can build a tower with blocks or string beads into a shoelace. These are activities that require concentration and dexterity of hands. He can also match objects and sort them according to categories like clothes or toys.
  2. Engaging in pretend play: Engaging in pretend play marks the shift from the literal to the symbolic. Pretend play involves problem solving and complex thinking, and helps in the development of language. It works as an outlet for her feelings in a safe way.
  3. Playing by himself: He can either play by himself or with playmates of the same age. He would love to ride tricycles and play throwing games. He may also involve himself with a group of two or three toddlers and take turns or change roles during pretend play.
  4. Understanding cause and effect: She may begin to understand cause and effect, which leads to exploration. It helps her recognise that she can repeat actions either voluntarily or intentionally. It also helps her learn that certain physical sensations lead to certain experiences. This concept can be used for potty training. As the understanding of cause and effect increases, she will become more interested in winding up toys, turning lights and appliances on and off, etc.
  5. Sensing time: At around three years of age, his sense of time will be more clear. He can understand his routine as well as that of others. He can understand that holidays and birthdays do not occur regularly but once in a while. But, he may not have an idea of how long a year is.
  6. Getting to know relationships between objects: She will begin to understand the relationship between objects. She can match shapes and solve simple jigsaw puzzles.
  7. Comprehending purpose of numbers: He can understand the purpose of numbers for counting objects, especially the number 2.

To help with your preschooler’s development, you should try to engage him in imaginative play toys or figures to help him learn and test his ideas. Sometimes, reasoning with him may be difficult as his reasoning is one-sided and he views everything in very simple terms. He can often confuse fantasy with reality.


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