Parenting - Other | 0-18 yrs

Wonderful Traditions From Around The World For Welcoming Newborns

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The birth of a child is important not just for a family, but also for the world. It fills everyone with hope that the child may one day grow up to make the world a better place. Therefore, he birth of a child is an occasion for celebration.

Around the world, in different cultures, there are wonderful traditions for welcoming a newborn. These customs and rituals have a long history. In fact, research is beginning to show that some of these traditions may even have their roots in science.

This ClipBook brings to you the various ways humans choose to welcome their young ones into the world.

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Hatsumiyamōde, Japan

This is a custom generally practiced by the people who follow the traditional Japanese religion called Shinto. In this custom, the newborn makes her first visit to the shrine of the deity worshiped by the family. This can be done as early as 7 da...

Aqiqah, Islamic Nations

This is a traditional ritual that is a way of welcoming the newborn baby into the family. It is usually done on the seventh day of the baby’s birth, but it can be done later as well. People usually tend to do it in days after the birth that are mu...

Brit Milah, Israel

Brit Milah is the Hebrew name for circumcision and is a very important ritual in Judaism, which is the religion of most of inhabitants of Israel. This is a ritual performed on newborn and is usually witnessed by the people of the community.

Omugwo, (Southeastern) Nigeria

This is the custom of caring for the mother and the baby after the birth and can even extend up to five months. A special diet is prepared for the mother, which she is supposed to adhere to strictly for regaining her health. During the Omugwo peri...

The Baby Blanket, United States

This may not be classified as a traditional custom. Although, specific to the USA, it is so common that it makes it to the list. In the USA most newborns are wrapped up in blankets, known as the ‘Kuddle-Up’ blanket, when they are first born.

Cuarentena, Latin America

In many Hispanic countries, some women do ‘La Cuarentena’, which translates to ‘quarantine’ in English. In this custom, women don’t perform strenuous activities and don’t eat certain foods for the first six months. The mothers only focus on breast...

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