Lifestyle - Reaching out | 0-18 yrs

Outdoor Activities For Children With Autism

ParentCircle

Autistic children need to be given extra care and attention. A kid with autism might have trouble: 

  • talking and learning the meaning of words
  • making friends or fitting in
  • dealing with changes (like trying new foods, having a substitute teacher, or having toys moved from their normal places)
  • dealing with loud noises, bright lights, or busy hallways

One of the best ways to help them is by engaging them in outdoor activities. Sounds, sights and feelings are at their peak therapeutic value and all you have to do is step outside. Go through this ClipBook to know 6 outdoor activities that can prove immensely beneficial to autistic children.

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Treasure Hunt

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Rolling Around

Got wheels? Then your kids are good to go! Bikes, scooters and skateboards encourage balance, motor planning and linear acceleration, all necessary for effective sensory processing. Make sure helmets and pads are worn at all times!

Obstacle Course

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Hopscotch

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Follow The Leader

If you have a child with autism spectrum disorder, you may find it difficult to join in with him when he’s playing, or to catch his attention when you want to show him something. Find out how copying or imitating your child can be a fun and easy w...

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