Learning - Science | 10-18 yrs

100 Life Science Lessons: Part 2

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Several methods can be followed to teach children about life science. Basic learning deals with characteristics, needs and behavioral pattern of living beings. This, in the long term can help your child develop an aptitude to trace patterns or learn by observing people. Life science also talks about needs of living beings and this can help instill managerial and leadership qualities right from the beginning. This can make your kids enthusiastic about the living beings surrounding them like trees and plants, and observe patterns that may not have been noted before. This subject is known for not only making the kids knowledgeable, but also making them realize the importance of co-existence of all species. A good example is observing the process of germination of a seed growing into a plant, giving flowers, and pollination with the help of bee. Life science activities are simple and do not require any investment. It could include nurturing a pet and observing its growth carefully. The objective behind life science is to create a futuristic harmonic environment that celebrates the idea of co-existence and can help us save species from extinction.

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