Baby Feeding Schedule (6 to 11 Months)

Are you confused about what baby foods are best for your little one as she enters her sixth month? Do you need a baby feeding schedule for feed times and portions? You’ll find useful information here.

By V Saravana Kumar

Baby Feeding Schedule (6 to 11 Months)

It has been established beyond doubt that there is absolutely no substitute for mother’s milk. It has all the nutrients essential for the baby’s growth and for building immunity. Ideally, babies should be given mother’s milk for two years or even longer. But as your little one crosses the 6-month mark, his feeding habits start to evolve. The child, who was hitherto wholly dependent on breast milk or formula feed, is now ready to explore a variety of foods in the form of semi-solids and solids, to meet his growing appetite and nutritional needs.

So, you will have to come up with a diet schedule that matches the different phases of your baby’s development. And, we’re here to help you do this.

Let’s take a detailed look at what you can feed your baby from 6 to 11 months, and how to devise a baby feeding schedule.

There are a number of foods that you can introduce to your baby during this phase. The list includes fruits, vegetables, lentils, grains and dairy products. You can use these to prepare purée or porridge for your baby. You can also start giving her ready-made baby cereal.

Introducing solid food in a baby’s diet

Your baby reaches an important milestone in her growth once she is ready to take solid foods. As a parent, you need to make this transition smooth and trouble-free. Before introducing solid foods, you should make sure that your baby is able to do the following:

  • Hold her head in a steady, upright position.
  • Sit with support.
  • Lean forward and open her mouth on seeing food.

When you are sure your baby can do all this, you can also be sure he’s ready for semi-solid foods. However, do remember to not give your baby a bowl full of porridge or different types of solid food all at once.

When introducing your baby to food other than breast milk, you have to go slow. Add new items to the menu one at a time. Here’s how to do it:

  • Start with a single-ingredient food with no added sugar or salt. It could be carrots, apples, or lentils, for instance. Serve it puréed, stewed or as porridge. Give your baby only a teaspoon or two to start with. Check if it induces any adverse reactions such as diarrhoea, vomiting or rashes. If your baby shows no such problems, you can continue giving him that food item, gradually increasing the quantity over time.
  • Introduce other single-food items in succession, leaving a few days’ gap between each new addition. However, every time you introduce something new, watch out for any adverse reactions. Also, take care to increase the portion sizes only in a gradual manner.
  • Once your baby begins to have three or four different food items in a semi-solid form and is comfortable with them, you can offer a combination of foods. The same principle of ‘watch and continue’ applies here too.
  • While introducing store-bought baby cereal, begin with a single-grain, an iron-fortified one, such as rice, barley or oatmeal, mixed with 4 tablespoons of breast milk or formula. Start with one or two teaspoons, and gradually increase the serving sizes.
  • Gradually, add vegetables puréed with no added sugar or salt to the cereal.

Remember to make your baby sit upright whenever you are feeding her, and offer the food using a small spoon. Give her ample time to get used to the new textures, and to learn how to swallow.

Here are some tips to help your child transition to solid foods in a hassle-free manner:

  • There is a possibility that your baby will refuse semi-solid food the first time you give it to him. Don’t lose heart if this happens. Try again after a few days. He may be more willing to accept it then. If not, keep trying a few times. After several attempts, if your baby is still rejecting the food, you could ask your pediatrician for suggestions.
  • Your baby needs at least 120-150 mL of water per day once she starts taking semi-solid and solid food. This is to keep her hydrated and avoid being constipated because of solid foods.
  • Your baby is the best judge of how much semi-solid or solid food he wants to have. When he has had enough, he might resist your efforts to feed him more by crying or turning away his face. When this happens, don't force your baby to eat because there’s still some food left on the plate, or you feel he should eat more.

Food chart and feeding schedule

To help you organise your baby’s feeding process, we present a food chart and feeding schedule. This will come in handy while planning your little one’s daily diet.

6-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk or, if unavoidable, formula milk
  • Smooth purée made from vegetables or fruits
  • Store-bought single-grain baby cereals mixed with breast milk or formula.

7-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk, or formula if needed
  • Purée and baby cereals
  • Mashed bananas diluted with milk

8-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk or formula if needed
  • Purée, baby cereal, dal water, rice water, mashed bananas diluted with milk
  • Curd/yogurt, preferably homemade
  • Cooked and mashed potatoes and pumpkins

9-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk, or formula if needed
  • Purée, baby cereal, dal water, rice water, mashed bananas diluted with milk, homemade curd/yogurt, cooked and mashed potatoes and pumpkins
  • Mashed yolk of boiled egg (after consulting your paediatrician)
  • Porridge made with wheat, ragi, oats and sooji

10-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk or formula if needed
  • Purée, baby cereal, dal water, rice water, mashed bananas diluted with milk, homemade curd/yogurt, cooked and mashed potatoes and pumpkins
  • Mashed yolk of boiled egg, wheat, ragi, oats and sooji porridge
  • Small quantity of cheese and paneer cooked with vegetables and/or meat
  • Soup made using tomatoes or spinach
  • Soft fruits such as orange, banana or poached apple and pears

11-month baby food chart

What to feed:

  • Breast milk or formula if needed
  • Purée, baby cereal, dal water, rice water, mashed bananas diluted with milk, homemade curd/yogurt, cooked and mashed potatoes and pumpkins
  • Mashed yolk of boiled egg, ground cooked meat, wheat, ragi, oats and sooji porridge
  • Small quantity of cheese and paneer added to vegetables and/or meat while cooking
  • Soup made using tomatoes or spinach
  • Soft fruits such as orange, banana or poached apple and pears
  • Soft-cooked and mashed khichdi
  • Soft pieces of idli and dosa
  • Finger foods such as crackers, bananas and apples, boiled eggs and cooked pasta

Remember: Cook fruits and vegetables by steaming or baking instead of boiling, as it depletes the nutrients. 

Also read: Toddler (1–2 Years) Food Chart - Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Snacks Ideas

Feeding portions for various foods

Breast milk or formula:

  • 6 to 8 months – 200 to 240 mL per day in 3 to 5 feeds
  • 9 to 11 months – 220 to 280 mL per day in 3 to 5 feeds

Baby cereal:

  • 6 to 8 months – 3 to 5 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds
  • 9 to 11 months – 4 to 6 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds

Vegetables:

  • 6 to 8 months – 2 to 3 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds
  • 9 to 11 months – 2 to 4 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds

Fruits:

  • 6 to 8 months – 2 to 3 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds
  • 9 to 11 months – 2 to 4 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds

All other foods:

  • 6 to 8 months – 1 to 2 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds
  • 9 to 11 months – 2 to 3 tablespoons per day in 2 feeds

Remember: The quantities given above are approximations. Respect your child’s instincts on how much, or how little, she wants to eat.

Foods that you should not give your baby

Avoid giving your baby the following foods:

  • Honey: It might cause botulism, a serious condition that causes multiple complications, if introduced too early.
  • Cow's milk: Babies under one year don’t have the ability to digest cow’s milk. Stick to breast milk or formula.
  • Whole nuts and grapes: These can cause choking.
  • Sugar and salt: It is better to delay the introduction of the refined versions of these as long as possible. Your baby will get the required quantity of both through the food she eats.

As you prepare to celebrate your baby’s first birthday, keep adding various foods to her menu. But we can’t stress enough that she still needs breast milk. It is the best source of vital nutrients; so, if possible, continue breastfeeding until she turns two.

The six-month milestone in a baby’s life is the time when the foundation of lifelong food habits are laid. Following a planned feeding schedule and slowly leading him to explore more food options will instil in your child a love for food and different flavours. Be his guide in making healthy choices. Make the process of having food fun for your little one!  

About the expert:

Reviewed by Dr Neha Sanwalka Rungta on 25 September 2019

Dr Neha Sanwalka Rungta is a paediatric nutritionist and director of NutriCanvas.

About the author:

Written by V Saravana Kumar on 13 September 2019; updated on 25 September 2019

The author is a writer, translator, editor, artist, graphic designer and a start-up enthusiast. He is also learning the art of parenting through his two teenaged children.

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